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Lack Of Physical, Mental Strength Key Deterrent For Indian Parents To Fulfil Own Dreams: Abbott Dream Survey

India could be home to the world's largest youth population with more than 50 per cent of its population below the age of 25 and more than 65 per cent below the age of 35

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India could be home to the world's largest youth population with more than 50 per cent of its population below the age of 25 and more than 65 per cent below the age of 35. But it could soon become the country of most tired and disappointed elder population too if the health of an increasing aged men and women is continued to be ignored.

A first of its kind survey amongst 1200 young working professionals and their parents across Indian metros showed that 90 per cent of the parents aged over 50 have their dreams focused on their children's education, career, marriage and settling down. While 65 per cent parents have unfulfilled dreams relating to their own desires, 97 per cent agreed that if they had sufficient physical strength, they could realise their dreams.

Titled as Dream Survey, this interesting study was conducted by the Indian arm of US drugs and nutrition company Abbott. The study was conducted with mainly seeking answer to three socially relevant questions, including whether dreams are just the prerogatives of youth alone; have parent postponed their dreams to focus on their children and will the parents ever have the strength to chase their dreams again.

The study, which was reviewed by BW Businessworld, however found that Indian families are more connected than ever and they are discussing their dreams, but loss of physical and mental strength stopping many older adults from achieving their unmet goals. It was also found in the survey that parents, mostly in Delhi and Chennai, have cut down their travel and socialising as they do not have the energy anymore, even to do their daily chores.

Travel is one of the top dreams for most of the aged parents surveyed. While, entrepreneurship and financial in dependence are the other important dreams for them. Some 25 per cent of parents contacted for the study wanted to see their grand children and almost one sixth of them want to help raise those grand children.

Strikingly, a vast majority or at least 97 per cent of these parents agreed that if they had sufficient physical strength, they could realise their dreams. This was mainly because lack of strength has literally affected their quality of life in many ways, including exercise, cutting down on travel and socialising. And for many, even the daily activities such as shopping or picking up heavy things have become difficult.

While, most of the young, who were surveyed said they owe their parents a huge debt for raising them and making them what they are. The other interesting findings in the survey were an increasing trend of connected families and the young generation’s realisation of the fact that t their parents face obstacles in achieving their dreams. In the survey, 93 per cent of sons and daughters said that they ow their parents a huge debt for raising them and making them what they are. The study also proved that family connections has comparatively strengthened as 80 per cent of parents are living with at least one child and spend at least two hours a day with them. And, for those not living with their parent, one in two children said they talk to their parents on a daily basis.

While, 78 per cent of youth believe that their parents face obstacles in achieving their dreams. This was more pronounced in Chennai, Hyderabad and Kolkata. Lack of strength emerges as the top barrier with 44 per cent children stating that this was a key reason parents could not live a more fulfilling life.

“In India, we have a life expectancy of 65 years, where most people experience loss of strength from a prime age of 50,” says Shweta Rastogi, clinical dietician at Gurunanak Hospital, Mumbai.

“To restore strength and energy older adults need a complete and balanced scientific nutrition and the pursuit of a strong healthy life rests with both parents and children. While nutrition aids physical strength, children as caregivers can be the ultimate source of mental health,” she added.

People who were instrumental in conceptualising this first of kind study in India say that the findings of this survey are an eye opener.

“The Ensure (the survey was named after Abbott’s adult nutrition brand Ensure) Dreams Survey and its findings open up an amazing opportunity in India for children and their parents to come gether to continue achieving their dreams together,” said Amal Kelshikar, country head and general manager, Abbott Nutrition India.


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mental strength healthcare

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