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Book Review: Legendary Hero

The book chronicles the major events from the end of the Mughal era to the colonisation of India by Europeans and focusses on the Indian freedom struggle, fought not just in the Indian subcontinent but in various places from the West coast of America to the powerful capital cities of Europe, Burma and Japan and the focal centre of India

Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose is a larger than life personality surrounded by a thick shroud of mystery. Would Independent India be any different if Netaji was there? — the answer to which we will never know. But what we do know is the life and times of this iconic leader could be taken as the guiding light to set ablaze the sense of patriotism in today’s youth.

Ever since the release of the undisclosed documents about Bose, starting early 2016 by the Indian government, there has been an increase in curiosity levels among the youth to know more about Netaji’s unrelenting patriotism, his romantic saga, his voyages, the clandestine escapes, and final disappearance.

Bhuvan Lall’s book The Man India Missed The Most is a book perhaps written to satisfy this quest for knowledge about Bose’s life. Though many authors have written about this freedom fighter, Lall has written this book exclusively to chronicle Bose’s life and, at the same time, also to introduce him to this generation as never before. The book also forms the author’s groundwork towards making a feature film, a TV documentary illustrating the captivating personality of Bose on screen.

The book chronicles the major events from the end of the Mughal era to the colonisation of India by Europeans and focusses on the Indian freedom struggle, fought not just in the Indian subcontinent but in various places from the West coast of America to the powerful capital cities of Europe, Burma and Japan and the focal centre of India. Lots of research has been undertaken by the author, scrutinising several archives and lots of information present there in, about the Indian freedom struggle in general and Bose and his Indian National Army in particular.

Apart from being Bose’s biography of sorts, Lall’s book also serves as a good summary of India’s colonial past.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in the article above are those of the authors' and do not necessarily represent or reflect the views of this publishing house. Unless otherwise noted, the author is writing in his/her personal capacity. They are not intended and should not be thought to represent official ideas, attitudes, or policies of any agency or institution.




Aparna Tadimety

The author is a freelance contributor

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